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White Ribbon Research

White Ribbon Australia develops research to educate and innovative resources to aid in the prevention of men’s violence against women.

White Ribbon Australia develops research to educate and to aid in the prevention of men’s violence against women.

Ambassador Research Project

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In a global first, White Ribbon Australia has opened its Ambassador program up to researchers. A team at the University of Wollongong independently evaluated why men become Ambassadors, violence prevention activities, and the challenges facing advocacy to prevent men’s violence against women.

Conducted in 2016 by Kenton Bell and Claire E. Seaman, this case study shows the key role men can play in violence prevention.

 

 

The White Ribbon Policy and Research Series

The White Ribbon Policy and Research Series focuses on the prevention of men’s violence against women. These papers are written by independent academics and policy makers.

2017 - Towards an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence prevention framework

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This paper explores the essential principles required for the development of an effective violence prevention framework for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men and boys, to reduce and prevent violence against women and children. Informed by a knowledge circle of nationally recognised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence prevention experts, the paper considers the socio-political context in which violence occurs, identifies critical elements to guide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander violence prevention and cites good practice approaches to violence prevention supported by case studies.

2016 - Key issues in working with men from immigrant and refugee communities

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This report explores the key issues in working with men from immigrant and refugee communities in Australia to prevent violence against women. It applies a feminist intersectional approach to the question of men’s engagement and examines a range of issues that need to be considered in the development of primary prevention engagement strategies for immigrant and refugee men.

2014 - Women Safety is a Men's Issue

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Community attitudes are an essential factor in the understanding of men’s violence against women. Attitudes influence social and cultural norms, and are an indicator of the way in which we think about and engage with issues of violence. Attitudes influence early detection; inform responses to men’s violence against women; determine whether violence is recognised; influence how victims are supported and whether perpetrators are held to account.

Youth Survey

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The majority of Australian young people believe domestic violence to be common in Australian society according to a survey conducted by Youth Action NSW and White Ribbon Australia released today. The survey of over 3000 respondents examined attitudes of young people aged between 16-25 years and explored young people’s views toward gender stereotypes and violence in Australian society, including online domestic violence.

Gender, education and the perceived causes of dating violence in Australian society

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This study examined the perceptions and attitudes of young Australian adults toward domestic violence and dating violence. This study was based on a convenience sample of 3193 individuals who completed an online survey hosted on the White Ribbon Australia website. Attitudes towards, and perceptions of, domestic and dating violence were examined according to the gender and the study status of respondents at the time of the survey (i.e., high school students, post-secondary students, and non-students).

Understanding the statistics of male violence against women

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There are a number of statistics used or quoted to show the extent of MVAW in Australia.

At the outset, it is important to note that all statistics about MVAW, regardless of their source, will be a conservative or under‑estimate of the actual extent of the problem. This is because there will always be women who are understandably distressed or embarrassed about having been subjected to such violence, and as such, do not disclose or report it.

Genders at work: Exploring workplace equality

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This report examines the role of workplaces, and men in workplaces, in preventing men’s violence against women. The report begins by noting that men’s violence against women is a widespread social problem which requires urgent action. It highlights the need for preventative measures oriented to changing the social and structural conditions at the root of this violence, including through settings such as workplaces.

From violence to coercive control

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Most terms used to describe the types of violence women experience hide the everyday reality for many women throughout the world that the perpetrators of this violence against women, and indeed even against other men, are men. Gender-neutral language is continually used; for example, family violence, domestic violence, intimate partner violence, violence in the home, sexual assault, and community-based violence.

Men Speak Up

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Men’s violence against women can be reduced and prevented. Individuals can act to lessen violence in their own lives and the lives of those around them, organisations and communities can work to build gender‑equal relations between women and men, and governments can take action to shift the structural and cultural underpinnings of men’s violence against women.

Where Men Stand

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The report is guided by the fundamental belief that men can play a positive role in preventing men’s violence against women. Indeed, without men’s involvement, efforts to reduce and prevent violence against women will fail.

 

An assault on our future

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This report examines how violence against women specifically affects children and young people. It looks at the nature of violence, they experience in their homes and their own relationships, its impacts, and the priorities for action if efforts to prevent violence among, and protect, young people are to be successful.